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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2014
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
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Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Literature Into Film

In conjunction with an eight-week School of Film class taught on Monday evenings by Pietro Ferrua, we are pleased to screen this eclectic selection of films that explore the various ways film directors interpret literary works—from short stories and plays to novels—converting prose into cinematic language and structure. While each film can be seen individually, those enrolled in the class will consider them together while exploring issues of creative interpretation and ethics, reading and discussing the original texts, and coming to a deeper appreciation of the aesthetic choices at play in moving from page to screen. Class registration includes admission to all of the films in the series. Pietro Ferrua, professor emeritus at Lewis and Clark College, is an author, essayist, translator/interpreter, mixed media artist, and scholar of the artistic and literary avant gardes.

To enroll in the Literature into Film class, click here.



Wed, Apr 10, 2013
at 7 PM

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THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST
DIRECTOR: ANTHONY ASQUITH
GREAT BRITAIN, 1952

“Although Oscar Wilde’s play premiered in 1893, it took several decades to reach the screen. Asquith was the first of four directors to attempt the adaptation (followed by Kurt Baker [1992], who featured a completely African-American cast; Oliver Parker [2002], who won a Best Costume Design award for his take; and filmmaking duo Brian Bedford and David Stern [2011], who re-established, partially, the version Wilde had originally written, in four acts and with one additional character). For his part, Asquith was quite faithful to the original text, although the cinematic medium allowed him to expand space and location. Held by many critics as the best British comedy ever written, Wilde’s story is based on his characters’ invention of jargons and personas in order to disregard society’s conventions.”—Pietro Ferrua (95 mins.)

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Wed, Apr 17, 2013
at 6:30 PM

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CHILDREN OF PARADISE
DIRECTOR: MARCEL CARNÉ
FRANCE, 1945

“Generally considered among French, if not world, cinema’s greatest accomplishments, Carné’s film features not only grand settings but an extraordinary assemblage of actors—Étienne Decroux, who taught mime art to Marcel Marceau and Jean-Louis Barrault; Pierre Brasseur; Pierre Renoir; Maria Casares; Arletty; and more. The script, based on a mélange of French literary sources (to be discussed in class), centers on four admirers who court actress Garance (Arletty): a mime, an actor, a duke, and a killer. While she gives something of herself to each, she loves only the pure, naïve, romantic mime. Yet she renounces him on the touching plea of a boy wanting his father back. A fable-like tale soaked in the blood of dark 18th-century intrigue.”—PF (195 mins.)

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Tue, Apr 23, 2013
at 7 PM

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LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS
FRANCE, 1961

“Resnais’s landmark film was such a cultural event that it was featured on the front page of Paris’s prestigious Le Monde newspaper and soon became an international sensation. Revolutionary in its cinematography, the film also challenged modern logic, questioning the notions of past, present, and future and the distinctions between truth and lie, reality and dream, objectivity and subjectivity. Did the two main characters meet in Marienbad the previous year or not? While in interviews Resnais offered a cautious ‘perhaps!’, screenwriter Alain Robbe-Grillet stated that it was up to the viewer to build his/her own interpretation, thus asserting the viewer as co-author.”—PF (94 mins.)

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Tue, Apr 30, 2013
at 7 PM

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LADY IN THE LAKE
DIRECTOR: ROBERT MONTGOMERY
US, 1947

“Whether or not Raymond Chandler will be included in the pantheon of great American literature, he is credited with creating one of literature and cinema’s most beloved heroes, private eye Phillip Marlowe (played here by Robert Montgomery; also by Dick Powell in MURDER, MY SWEET [1944] and Humphrey Bogart in THE BIG SLEEP [1946]). In this unusual film noir, screenwriter Steve Fisher and director/star Robert Montgomery have situated Marlowe as the camera itself, his image only seen reflected in mirrors (a stratagem employed by Fassbinder in his EFFI BRIEST). Marlowe is hired to investigate a woman’s disappearance, which ultimately conceals a crime. In his directorial debut, Montgomery portrays Marlowe, whose journey is complicated by two beauties, played by Jayne Meadows and Audrey Totter.”—PF (105 mins.)

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Tue, May 7, 2013
at 7 PM

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BLOW-UP
DIRECTOR: MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI
ITALY, 1966

“Of Argentine writer Julio Cortázar’s short story ‘The Devil’s Drool,’ Antonioni opted to keep only the mechanism of magnification of the image hiding (perhaps) a suspicious reality, showing how far a film director can go to ‘render’ the ‘spirit’ of a literary work instead of transposing a mere plot. David Hemmings is a fashion photographer, Veruschka his favorite model, Vanessa Redgrave an elusive con woman, John Castle an abstract artist married to Vera Miles who tries to find sense in his paintings—among the many other characters all alienated from reality, all wanting to be somewhere or someone else. Both Cortázar and Antonioni chose the thriller’s style, but their search is not the whodunit but rather the ontological, the metaphysical.”—PF (111 mins.)

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Wed, May 15, 2013
at 7 PM

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SECONDS
DIRECTOR: JOHN FRANKENHEIMER
US, 1966

“Novelist David Ely is frequently cited as a science fiction writer. He should be listed instead as a metaphysical writer, a category that has few followers in America, which perhaps explains why this masterpiece was so little seen. Seeking to make an auteur film, Frankenheimer was attracted by Ely’s unusual Faustian story, which combined horror, suspense, science fiction, mythology, psychology, and more. Assisted by cinematographer James Wong Howe, screenwriter Lewis John Carlino, composer Jerry Goldsmith, and actors John Randolph and Rock Hudson, Frankenheimer creates an evocative atmosphere to tell the story of a disillusioned man who enlists a secret agency to help him fake his death and emerge with a new life.”—PF (106 mins.)

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Tue, May 21, 2013
at 7 PM

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DIABOLIQUE
DIRECTOR: JEREMIAH S. CHECHIK
US, 1996

“Celebrated French writers Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac, who wrote together under the nom de plume Boileau-Narcejac, are best known for such works as the novel D’ENTRE LES MORTS which inspired Alfred Hitchcock’s VERTIGO (1958), the adaptation of Jean Redon’s novel LES YEUX SANS VISAGE into Georges Franju’s EYES WITHOUT A FACE (1960), and the novel CELLE QUI N’ÉTAIT PLUS from which Henri-Georges Clouzot fashioned his cult classic DIABOLIQUE (1955). Chechik’s 1996 version of DIABOLIQUE, which recounts the story of the wife and mistress of a cruel schoolmaster who try to do him in, was a box office and critical disaster, despite the presence of actresses Sharon Stone and Isabelle Adjani and Chechik’s faithfulness to the original text. A case study in adaptation and remake; at the same time, perhaps due rehabilitation.”—PF (107 mins.)

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Wed, Jun 5, 2013
at 7 PM

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ORIGINAL SIN
DIRECTOR: MICHAEL CRISTOFER
US, 2001

“Few American writers have inspired more filmmakers than Cornell Woolrich, who wrote under the aliases George Hopley and William Irish. His short story ‘It Had to Be Murder’ became Alfred Hitchcock’s REAR WINDOW, and his novel WALTZ INTO DARKNESS was adapted first by François Truffaut as MISSISSIPPI MERMAID and, more recently, by Cristofer as ORIGINAL SIN. The plots of both versions initially correspond: a merchant (here Luis Vargas, played by Antonio Banderas) wants to marry a simple woman, while hiding from her his immense fortune. But the girl (Angelina Jolie) has her own agenda. Along the way, Cristofer (also the screenwriter) adds some plot twists of his own. Reading the novel, one feels the strength of Woolrich’s myth, but the director innovates beyond.”—PF (116 mins.)

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