Newsroom
Calendar
   
ABOUT US
SUPPORT US
SPONSORS
PORTLAND ART MUSEUM

eNewsletter Sign-Up

Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2014
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Special Screenings


Wed, Sep 9, 2009
at 8:30 PM

Fri, Sep 11, 2009
at 8:30 PM

Sat, Sep 12, 2009
at 8:30 PM

Sun, Sep 13, 2009
at 6:30 PM

PASSING STRANGE
DIRECTOR: SPIKE LEE
US, 2009

Part rock concert, part memoir, part Broadway musical, Spike Lee’s new film is a cinematic record of singer-songwriter Stew’s play PASSING STRANGE, winner of numerous Best Musical awards (Drama Desk, NY Film Critics Circle, Obie) and the Tony Award in 2008 for Best Book of a Musical. Lee breaks conventions to tell this story of a young L.A. songwriter’s international journey to self-discovery—Stew's profound autobiographical treatise on black identity, told in both past and present time. A young aspiring musician in mid-1970s L.A., Stew strains against the complacency and bourgeois aspirations of his middle-class, religious upbringing and eventually leaves Los Angeles for Europe in his quest for “the real.” Alternately melancholy and amazed, Stew himself watches and narrates as his alter ego fumbles his way to maturity on a European voyage that takes him to the liberations of Amsterdam and the post-punk cabarets of Berlin. In the end he finds that complexity and even hypocrisy are not limited to middle-class black America, and that while for him art may be more real than life, only love is truly more than real. One-upping the Broadway show, Lee doesn’t just break down the “fourth wall,” he uses 14 cameras to place the viewer into the onstage performance, as well as in the midst of the creative backstage energy.

( 135 min )

Special thanks to Media Sponsor The Skanner.


^ Top

Wed, Sep 16, 2009
at 7 PM

PÉPÉ LE MOKO
DIRECTOR: JULIEN DUVIVIER
FRANCE, 1937

By nature, poets, dreamers, and philosophers question the very existence of true love. Finding love, and ultimately losing it, makes for eternal human drama—whether told through an operatic tragedy like Giacomo Puccini’s LA BOHÈME, or through poetic cinema like Duvivier’s PÉPÉ LE MOKO. Hiding out in the labyrinthine Casbah of Algiers, charismatic jewel thief Pépé Le Moko (Jean Gabin, in one of his most memorable performances) is beset from all sides—women want him, the police want him more, and his rivals would just like to see him dead. No one seems able to touch him—that is, until he meets a beautiful Parisian playgirl who compels him to leave his former life for what may be his only chance at true love. One of the most influential films of the twentieth century, this atmospheric classic paved the way for what would become known as film noir, a genre infused with romantic fatalism.

( 94 min )

Co-presented with the Portland Opera, which is presenting LA BOHÈME September 25 – October 3.


^ Top

Fri, Sep 18, 2009
at 7 PM

Sun, Sep 20, 2009
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Sep 20, 2009
at 7 PM

ART & COPY
DIRECTOR: DOUG PRAY
US, 2009

VISITING ARTIST—ART & COPY is about advertising and creativity: the profound effects of advertising on modern culture and the innovative minds that have shaped the industry. Beginning with the "Creative Revolution" of the mid-1960s, ART & COPY features writers and artists such as Lee Clow, who introduced the Macintosh computer in the commercial "1984"; Dan Wieden, who coined "Just Do It" and forever changed how we connect personal achievement and sports; Hal Riney, whose emotional “It’s morning in America” ads iced Ronald Reagan’s reelection; Phyllis K. Robinson, who helped invent the "me generation" with a Clairol tagline; George Lois, whose “I want my MTV” animated the channel; Tommy Hilfiger, whose campaign turned his name into an instant fashion success story; Jeff Goodby and Rich Silverstein—"Got Milk?"; and Mary Wells Lawrence, who repackaged the city of New York via her "I love NY" campaign. By defying the conventions of traditional advertising and focusing more on ideas and images than overt sales, each of these creative pioneers brought a revolutionary spirit to their work. Along with entertaining interviews, Pray (SURFWISE, SCRATCH) interweaves captivating historical footage and some of the great ads of all time to fashion an inspiring tribute to the synthesis of art, commerce, and human emotion. Here’s the beef.

( 86 min )

Sponsored by Portland Advertising Federation.


^ Top

Wed, Sep 23, 2009
at 7:30 PM

SILVER SCREEN CLUB MEMBERS PREVIEW: BRIGHT STAR
DIRECTOR: JANE CAMPION
AUSTRALIA, 2009

“Sixteen years after THE PIANO, Jane Campion has found renewed artistic inspiration in a tragic romance to match the haunting intensity of that Palme D'Or winning feature. BRIGHT STAR, set in London in 1818, tells the story of the love affair between English poet John Keats (Ben Whishaw) and the fashionable Fanny Brawne (Abbie Cornish), with a classical poise, exquisite craftsmanship, and a piercing tenderness...Taking her lead from the sensuality of Keats' verses, Campion has created a film that revels in the beauty of the English countryside...The central love affair is expressed through modest caresses, clasped hands, and lingering glances rather than anything more explicit. It is a dreamy film to make the viewer swoon.”—Screen Daily.

( 119 min )

Admission for Silver Screen members and their guests only.


Special thanks to Apparition.


^ Top

Sun, Sep 27, 2009
at 2 PM

33RD YOUNG PEOPLE'S FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL: GROWING NEW TALENT
DIRECTOR: VARIOUS
US, 2009

The Young People's Film & Video Festival is an annual opportunity for K-12 Northwest film and video makers living in the region to have their work juried by professional media artists and presented to the public. The Festival encourages young people to use film and video to creatively express personal concerns, explore important social issues, and share engaging stories about the world today. Please join us for this year’s Winners' Program of animation, dramas, and documentaries chosen out of an entry field of 100+ entries. Many of the young filmmakers will be present. Thanks to this year’s Festival jurors Peter Vince, Anna Farrell, and Martha Early for their insightful, knowledgeable, and thoughtful efforts in viewing this year's submissions. Congratulations to all! Thanks to the Oregon Arts Commission for its support.

THE CASE OF THE MISSING HOMEWORK
This case needs to be solved by all!
Ms. Sigmund’s class, grades 5-6, The Emerson School, Portland, OR.

DRIVER’S ED
Don’t be stupid - just read the book.
Connor Bechtol, Brandon Clindaniel, Bryce Clinton, McKenzie Hamilton, Colton Heidt, Alex Kuhn, Marcus McGuire, Layton Mickey, Efren Plancarte, Jonah Smith, Jordan Smith, Alexiss Stewart, and Jacob Wiegel, grades 6-8, Duniway Middle School, McMinnville, OR.

DRUG AWARENESS PROJECT: PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS
Peer-to-peer education.
Students of Newport High School, grades 9-12, Lincoln County Drug Awareness Project, Newport, OR.

FINDING THE MUSIC
Breaking a fake guitar brings a young musician to his real talent.
Blair Scott, Sheridan Koelher, and Alex Schellar, grade 10, Ballard High School / Media Issues, Seattle, WA.

THE LIFE OF WATER PERSON
Cool sun trumps aqueous water.
Layton Mickey and Alex Kuhn, grade 7, Patton Middle School, McMinnville, OR.

THE LIGHT
Lumens cast a shadow on Mr. Stick.
Peter Gicking, grade 10, Arts & Magnet Communication Academy, Beaverton, OR.

MURDER AT THE PHARAOH’S GRAVE
Archeologist Ellis Clarke unearths the truth about a colleague’s disappearance.
Ben Kadie, grade 8, Bellevue, WA.

NATIVE TRUTH FILM PROJECT: PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS
Reducing Native youth smoking while challenging the social norm of commercial tobacco use.
Students of Yakama Nation, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes & Spokane Tribe, grades 5-12, Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board.

ONLY ONE
That’s all it takes.
Alex McKnight, grade 7, Tigard, OR.

ROAMING
An inevitable conflict.
Adrian Andrich, grade 11, Arts & Communication Magnet Academy, Beaverton, OR.

SARAH GAHAGAN: STITCHING A NEW PATH
Costume artist Sarah Gahagan creates a new approach to wardrobe design.
Gabrielle Walti, grade 11, Oregon Children's Theatre, Hillsboro, OR.

SNAGS
Beavers, beetles, garter snakes, and salmon acting wild in their forest home.
Mrs. Robert’s class, grade 2, Buckman Elementary, Portland, OR.

SPARKS IN THE NIGHT
Detective Leon Sparks closes in on notorious lawbreaker Jerry Walker.
Ben Kadie, grade 8, Bellevue, WA.

THE UMBRELLA
The wind blows a young man’s cover.
Henry Shenk, Kaelan Gilman, and Perker Davis, grade 11, Ballard High School, Seattle, WA.

THE WAREHOUSE
How to avoid the Big Bang.
Zach Perry, grade 7, Arts & Communication Magnet Academy, Beaverton, OR.

YOU LIVE IN YOUR HEAD
The emotional stasis of one aged man.
Kathryn Van Buren, Alex Papac, and Isaac Sommers, grade 11, Ballard High School, Seattle, WA.

( 90 min )


FREE ADMISSION


^ Top

Fri, Oct 2, 2009
at 7 PM

Fri, Oct 2, 2009
at 9 PM

Sat, Oct 3, 2009
at 5 PM

Sat, Oct 3, 2009
at 7 PM

Sat, Oct 3, 2009
at 9 PM

UNMADE BEDS
DIRECTOR: ALEXIS DOS SANTOS
GREAT BRITAIN, 2008

"With his startlingly visceral and original second feature, Argentine filmmaker Alexis Dos Santos (GLUE) manifests a vivid, exuberant London where unbridled longing and zeal plunge nubile expats into lusty adventures and momentous encounters. When wide-eyed Spaniard Axl comes to London on a quest for the father who abandoned him, he lands in the middle of a creative hotbed—an underground polyglot squat filled with colorful free spirits. Among them is Vera, a beautiful Belgian girl recently dumped by her boyfriend. Surprising soundscapes and an effusive score aptly express the characters’ mercurial inner states. Meanwhile, slapstick moments and musical performances by fresh unknowns puncture the melancholy, buoying the film into irreverent whimsy. They may be slightly crumpled works in progress—like the unmade beds where they slumber—but Axl, Vera, and their friends are as vital as a crisp new day." —Sundance Film Festival. “The year's coolest paean to good music, bad hangovers, and lost love.”—Edinburgh Film Festival.

( 92 min )

In English, French and Spanish.


^ Top

Tue, Oct 6, 2009
at 7 PM

AN EVENING WITH BILL MORRISON

VISITING ARTIST—“The frame pauses briefly before the projector’s lamp and then moves on. Our lives are an accumulation of ephemeral images and moments that our consciousness constructs into a reality. No sooner have we grasped the present, it is relegated to the past, where it only exists in the subjective history of each individual.”—Bill Morrison. Tonight we welcome multi award-winning New York filmmaker (and Reed College graduate, class of 1985) Bill Morrison for a selection of his striking, poetic films. Fashioned from decaying archival footage, their striking spectral beauty conjures the origins of cinema and vanishing memories. The program includes the following short films: THE FILM OF HER (1996)—Unseen films and unsung lives: an unrequited celluloid romance is consummated in the vaults of the Library of Congress. Music by Henryk Gorecki and Bill Frisell. (12 mins.); GHOST TRIP (2002)—A man is shown his car, which he drives until it can be driven no more. Sound design by Michael Montes. (23 mins.); THE MESMERIST (2003)—A melting revision of James Young’s THE BELLS (1926), starring Lionel Barrymore and Boris Karloff. Music by Bill Frisell. (16 mins.); LIGHT IS CALLING (2004)—A meditation on the nature of random collisions, as seen through the roiling emulsion of an ancient film. Music by Michael Gordon. (8 mins.); THE HIGHWATER TRILOGY (2006)—Ancient newsreel footage of storms, floods, and icebergs. Music by David Lang and Michael Gordon. (31 mins.)

( 90 min )

Morrison will introduce the films and talk about his honored work.


^ Top

Fri, Oct 16, 2009
at 7 PM

Sat, Oct 17, 2009
at 2 PM

FRESH FRENCH SHORTS
DIRECTOR: VARIOUS

Our second annual compilation of recent shorts by French directors offers an eclectic selection of narrative, documentary, and animated international prize-winners, and a few fresh surprises. Cinema occupies an especially important place in French culture, with a tradition of major government support underwriting production, distribution, and exhibition both inside and outside the country. While established directors find funding for ambitious new feature films, significant investment also goes into short films by emerging, risk-taking talents that give voice to the diversity of French society and art. Each year up to 400 short films are produced that collectively offer a unique insight into French life and the next generation of French filmmakers.

Click here for the complete 2009 program, including film titles and descriptions.

Co-selected and presented with the Alliance Française de Portland.


Join us Friday at 6 p.m. in the Andree Stevens room for a pre film reception sponsored by the Alliance Française de Portland and Le Happy.


^ Top

Sat, Oct 17, 2009
at 6 PM

AN HOMAGE TO THE HOME MOVIE
DIRECTOR: VARIOUS

In honor of International Home Movie Day—a celebration of those quaint family-made artifacts generally not intended for public exhibition (unless you count the Christmas showing on the foldaway screen in your basement rumpus room)—we present a program of short films by Northwest filmmakers (among them Gus Van Sant, Patti Sakurai, Noah Start, Clancy Dennehy, and Matt McCormick) that pay homage to home movies or that re-use home movie footage with artistic intent...and success. "Saving our film heritage should not be limited only to commercially produced films. Home movies do not just capture the important private moments of our family's lives, but they are historical and cultural documents as well...Home Movie Day is a celebration of these films and the people who shot them."—Martin Scorsese. www.homemovieday.com.

Please note: This event takes place at the Northwest Film Center School of Film located at 934 SW Salmon (corner of 10th).


FREE ADMISSION


^ Top

Sat, Oct 17, 2009
at 7 PM

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
DIRECTOR: JEAN COCTEAU
FRANCE, 1946

French visionary poet, playwright, and painter, Jean Cocteau's first film—“the flesh and blood of my dreams”— visualizes the awesome beauty of the 18th century fairy tale by Madame LePrince de Beaumont. The tale of a young woman's love for an agonized beast is one of the cinema's most poetic works, forging inventive relationships between special make-up effects, photography, and art direction. Shot by noted French cinematographer Henri Alekan and featuring an exquisite score by George Auric, Cocteau's atmospheric film, with its shadowy castle and billowing curtains, perfectly suits this timeless tale of innocence, hope, and the power of redemption through love. “Probably Cocteau's finest film, this is a perfect marriage between Greek legend and his own personal mythology...effectively elaborating the theme of the poet caught between the worlds of the real and the imaginary.”—Holt’s Foreign Film Guide.

( 96 min )

SINGLE OR DOUBLE FEATURE (Double feature with ORPHEUS)

Double features cost an additional $2 to stay for both films. To purchase an advanced ticket for the double feature, be sure to select the DOUBLE FEATURE rather than the single ticket.


^ Top

Sat, Oct 17, 2009
at 8:45 PM

ORPHEUS
DIRECTOR: JEAN COCTEAU
FRANCE, 1949

"Jean Cocteau's ORPHEUS is the masterpiece of magical filmmaking. Through a narrative treatment of the legend of Orpheus in a modern Parisian setting, it is as inventive and enigmatic as a dream. Orpheus wants to get beyond the limits of human experience; he wants to reach the unknowable—the mystery beyond mortality. Jean Marais is ideally cast as the successful, popular poet who is envied by the younger poets; his conflicts, his desire to renew himself, his feverish listening for signals from the source of mystery, are the substance of the film. Dark, troubled, passionate Maria Casares is his Death; attended by her oaring motorcyclists—the hooded messengers of death—she is mystery incarnate."—Pauline Kael, The New Yorker.

( 95 min )

Co-sponsored by the Portland Opera, which is presenting Philip Glass’ Orphée, inspired by Jean Cocteau’s film, on November 6, 8, 12, & 14. Glass will also present a lecture on creativity and collaboration on November 3.


SINGLE OR DOUBLE FEATURE (Double feature with BEAUTY AND THE BEAST)

Double features cost an additional $2 to stay for both films. To purchase an advanced ticket for the double feature, be sure to select the DOUBLE FEATURE rather than the single ticket.


^ Top

Fri, Oct 23, 2009
at 8 PM

Sat, Oct 24, 2009
at 8 PM

Sun, Oct 25, 2009
at 7 PM

ARMCHAIR ACTORS PRESENT: THE MONSTER THAT CHALLENGED THE WORLD (AKA THE HUNT FOR DEAD OCTOBER)
DIRECTOR: ARNOLD CAVEN
US, 1957

They’re Back! Those wacky Armchair Actors, infamous for their past Film Center performances “Prom Time Live," “Hitchcocked,” and "From Maco With Love.” This time they’re spoofing the fifties Red Scare with a film that begins as a campy thriller about man-eating mollusks and becomes a romantic, zombie-rich saga that would make George Romero (NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD) queasy. A youthful Hans Conreid plays the scientist and Tim Holt (THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE) stars as the General. Plus, there’s a funny-looking secretary! With the film’s sound turned off, Don Alder, Eric Hull, Rob Sample, and Victoria Pohl command the images and provide their own voices, music, and sound effects live—with many laughs to follow. The new story? Well, that’s a surprise to be abetted by a few scenes improvised with live suggestions from the audience. “The real thrill in watching the Armchair Actors is the way they deftly walk the comic tightrope before your eyes, balanced only by an innate gift for timing and the ability to think fast and land on their feet." —Willamette Week.

( 86 min )

Special admission: $15 general; $10 members.


^ Top

Fri, Oct 30, 2009
at 7 PM

Fri, Oct 30, 2009
at 9 PM

Sat, Oct 31, 2009
at 5 PM

Sat, Oct 31, 2009
at 7 PM

Sat, Oct 31, 2009
at 9 PM

Sun, Nov 1, 2009
at 2 PM

MARY AND MAX
DIRECTOR: ADAM ELLIOTT
AUSTRALIA, 2008

“MARY AND MAX is unique. A clay animation by Academy Award–winning filmmaker Adam Elliott (HARVIE KRUMPET), it tells the simple story of a 20-year pen-pal friendship between two very different people: Mary Dinkle, a chubby, lonely 8-year-old girl living in the suburbs of Melbourne, and Max Horowitz, a 44-year-old Jewish man, who is severely obese, suffers from Asperger’s Syndrome, and lives an isolated life in New York City. It is very much a triumph of emotion, insight, and eccentricity—a complete delight. The originality of the voices in this ever-spinning kaleidoscope of innocence and idiosyncrasy comes straight from an incredibly rich imagination and complete artistic vision. This desire for acceptance and love amid the pain of existence is masterfully narrated by Barry Humphries and fleshed out by the voices of Philip Seymour Hoffman and Toni Collette. This film that explores friendship, autism, taxidermy, psychiatry, alcoholism, where babies come from, obesity, kleptomania, trust, copulating dogs, sexual and religious differences, agoraphobia, and more, and is rooted in a very personal relationship, is proof of why we go to the movies and a truly exceptional portrait of compassion and love.”—Sundance Film Festival (Opening Night Film).

( 92 min )

Mature Audiences.


^ Top

Sun, Nov 1, 2009
at 7 PM

GLASS: A PORTRAIT OF PHILIP IN TWELVE PARTS
DIRECTOR: SCOTT HICKS
AUSTRALIA/US, 2008

"I've been called a minimalist composer for more than 30 years, and while I've never really agreed with the description, I've gotten used to it."—Philip Glass. One of the most influential composers of our time, Philip Glass is widely credited with bringing art music to the masses. The film follows Glass across three continents: from the Coney Island Cyclone roller coaster, to an opera premiere in Germany, to a performance with a didgeridoo virtuoso in Australia. Hicks explores his creative process in opera, concert, and film (Errol Morris, Woody Allen, and Martin Scorsese are among the interviewees), and offers a uniquely intimate view of an inquisitive and deeply spiritual man.

( 119 min )

The Portland Opera is presenting Philip Glass’ opera, Orphée, inspired by Jean Cocteau’s classic film, November 6, 8, 12, & 14.


^ Top

Tue, Nov 3, 2009
at 7 PM

CREATIVITY AND COLLABORATION: AN EVENING WITH PHILIP GLASS

VISITING ARTIST—In anticipation of the Portland Opera’s production of Philip Glass’ Orphée, we welcome Glass for an animated exploration of how artistic collaboration across genres has influenced his work and the development of his career. Through his operas, symphonies, film scores, experimental theater, compositions for his own ensembles, and wide-ranging collaborations with artists—from Robert Wilson, Sol Lewitt, Twyla Tharp, and Allen Ginsberg to Yo-Yo Ma, David Bowie, and Godfrey Reggio—Glass has had an extraordinary and unprecedented impact upon the musical and intellectual life of our time. The evening will feature film clips, live piano selections, and lively discussion. Glass’ unique sense of curiosity, exploration, and risk-taking promises to expand our perspective on his work, being an artist, and on the nature of creative inquiry.

Co-presented by the Portland Opera, PICA and the Film Center.


Advance tickets: $25 general, $20 members at www.nwfilm.org or www.portlandopera.org.


^ Top


   
© 2009-2014 NWFilmCenter  |  home  |  location  |  contact  |  info@nwfilm.org  |  p: 503-221-1156 A-VIBE Web Development