June/July/August 2000


JUNE 4 - SUN 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
PERIPHERAL PRODUCE AND THE FILM CENTER PRESENT
AN EVENING WITH BILL BROWN
Texas filmmaker Bill Brown combines styles of documentary and personal narrative with stunning cinematography and novel structural observations. Tonight he will share three of his earlier works, ROSWELL (1994), HUB CITY (1995) and SECRET BRIDGES (1997), along with his newest work, CONFEDERATION PARK (1999), a recent prize winner at the Ann Arbor Film Festival. A meditation on Canadian nationalism, terrorist bombings, bad weather and the  "way the map in your head looks nothing like the map in your road atlas." (90 mins.)

JUNE 6 - TUE 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
OPEN MEADOWS PREMIERE
ARE WE SAFE? PORTLAND POLLUTION
U.S. 2000
Open Meadow Learning Center students have created a personal and public response to the environmental conditions of the urban Willamette River. Students’ original poetry is fused with river documentary footage, yielding a provocative sound/image synthesis that conveys a clear and potent personal voice.
FREE ADMISSION

JUNE 8   THU 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
SILVER SCREEN CLUB PREVIEW
BUTTERFLY
SPAIN 1999
DIRECTOR: JOSE LUIS CUERDA   Based on three tales from the book of stories "Que me Quieres, Amour?"by Manuel Rivas, Cuerda's adaptation is a tender saga of a young boy's coming of age on the eve of the Spanish Civil War. It is the winter of 1936. Moncho, about to begin school in his small Galicia village and struck with fear by the imposing reputation of his teacher, runs away. Don Gregorio seeks him out and brings him back, quickly forging a bond with his new young student.  A kind, gentle man in love with life, Don Gregorio introduces his students to the mysteries of nature by spending the spring class days in the glorious countryside. But one day in early summer, the world of butterflies, friendships and idealism are crushed forever by the reality of war. A prize winner at the San Sebastian Film Festival, and a hit at this year’s PIFF, this moving, poetic film celebrates all that life is worth living for. (95 mins.)  Print Courtesy of Miramax Films.
Admission is limited to Silver Screen Club members and guests.

JUNE 9 10 - FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
THE SOUTHERNER
US 1945
DIRECTOR: JEAN RENOIR   Adapted (screenplay by William Faulkner) from George Session Perry's novel "Hold Autumn in Your Hands," and generally considered to be Renoir's (RULES OF THE GAME, GRAND ILLUSION) finest American film, the story chronicles the struggle of a young farmer (Zachary Scott) to earn a living growing cotton on a derelict Texas farm. "What attracted me to the story was precisely the fact that there was no story, nothing but a series of strong impressions—the vast landscape, the simple aspirations of the hero, the heat and hunger...the characters attain a level of spirituality of which they themselves are unaware."—Jean Renoir. Restored 35mm print courtesy of the UCLA Film Archive.   (91 mins.)

JUNE 9 10 11   FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 P.M., SUN 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
A PERSONAL JOURNEY WITH MARTIN SCORSESE THROUGH AMERICAN MOVIES
US 1995
DIRECTOR: MARTIN SCORSESE   Martin Scorsese is the quintessential cinephile, at once a great filmmaker, passionate film student and dedicated preservationist. His riveting PERSONAL JOURNEY offers astute analysis, a wealth of film clips—from classics to the most obscure and under appreciated—and wonderful interviews to trace the history of the art form from the point of view of the great directors. Exploring the evolution of the western, gangster, noir, musical and other genres, as well as the technologies that have transformed the medium, lesser known B-directors find their place alongside Griffith, Ford, Berkeley, Welles, Mann, Minnelli, Wilder, Kubrick and numerous others who have shaped American film and been his inspiration. A valentine for all who love the movies.    (210 mins.)

JUNE 15 16 17 18
THU 7P.M., FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 P.M., SUN 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
DREAM OF LIGHT
SPAIN 1992
DIRECTOR: VICTOR ERICE   Winner of the International Critics' Prize at the Cannes Film Festival and recently voted the number-one film of the 1990s in an international critics poll, DREAM OF LIGHT is an exquisite, lingering portrait. Spanish realist painter Antonio Lopez Garcia meticulously paints a single work: a still life of the quince tree in his backyard. Hoping to capture the effect of the sun's light filtering through the tree's leaves before the ripening fruit falls in autumn, the artist remains unhurried. So does Erice, who captures Garcia's day-to-day progress, his thoughts on painting, on life, and how we come to know what it is we experience. "Erice...achieves a mesmerizing intensity...a thoughtful, delicate inquiry into the essence of the artistic process, and a tribute to the beauty and mutability of nature... One of a kind." —Janet Maslin, NEW YORK TIMES.   (138 mins.)

JUNE 16 17 -  FRI 7:30 P.M., SAT, 7:30 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
SPECTRES OF THE SPECTRUM
US 1999
DIRECTOR: CRAIG BALDWIN   "Nothing less than an alternative history of our century... that flips the technological dream world of the 'information age' over like a damp rock."—Vancouver Film Festival. Archivist/filmmaker Baldwin's (TRIBULATION 99, SONIC OUTLAWS) cutting-edge concoction blends new footage, clips from vintage movies and high energy narration in an often hilarious tale of father and daughter psychics out to save humanity from a futuristic war machine which is being used by the New Electromagnetic Order (NEO) to "bulk erase" our minds in the year 2007. The secret to mankind's salvation is hidden in clues embedded in old TV signals wafting through the cosmos. Baldwin's mastery of the medium—from his radical editing techniques to his fascinating and disorienting use of sound—makes SPECTRES both experimental and accessible. "A dazzling, non-stop collage of 50 years of television and movie detritus...suggesting the existence of a military-industrial-media conspiracy vast enough to induce panic in even the most jaded X-FILES fans."—VILLAGE VOICE.
Craig Baldwin in attendance.   (94 mins.)
Craig Baldwin will host a workshop on working with found-footage and producing activist collage essay films Saturday, June 17, 2-4 p.m. See class schedule for details.

JUNE 17  - SAT  2 PM
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
HOLLYWOOD VIDEO PRESENTS
24TH ANNUAL YOUNG PEOPLE’S FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL
U.S. 1998-2000
Join us for this year’s survey of film and video created by youth grades K-12 living in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Utah and Alaska. Many of the young mediamakers honored will be present in this free public program of shorts, animation and dramas recognized for their originality, artistic merit, technical achievement or conviction in investigation of subject matter.  Our thanks to past student winner Heidi Sanburg, high school teacher Danielle Risso and media professional Liza McQuade for serving as this year’s jurors, and to Hollywood Video for sponsorship of this year’s event.   (120 mins.)
FREE ADMISSION

JUNE 22  - THU 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
SILVER SCREEN CLUB PREMIERE
GROOVE
US 2000
DIRECTOR: GREG HARRISON   On a Friday, a single e-mail spreads through a loose internet community announcing an underground, all-night party at an abandoned San Francisco Warehouse. David, a not very successful and out-of-it writer, is invited to check it out by his brother Colin, a hip artist who is planning on using the event to lay a big surprise on his "rave"-maven girlfriend Harmony. Soon immersed in a pulsating, drugged-out underworld, the three get much more than they bargained for as they look for the groove. A low-budget, NASHVILLE-like take on youthful sub-culture, first time director Greg Harrison's film was one of the hits at this year's Sundance Film Festival with its authentic, high-energy look at a new generation's attempt to connect with life or escape from it.    (86 mins.)   Print courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics.
Admission limited to Silver Screen Club members and their guests.

JUNE 23 24 -  FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
SPICY LOVE SOUP
CHINA 1998
DIRECTOR: ZHANG YANG   Yang's warm, bright portrait of modern life in Beijing eschews the social, political and historical to tell five interrelated tales of the complexities of love. A schoolboy uses his recording skills to edit together a special "I Love You," while another hopes to reconcile his parents with a magic potion. An overworked husband and wife rediscover their love in mutual play while another couple recounts their courtship in flashbacks. In the centerpiece, an awkward first encounter between an older woman and three dating service suitors turns joyous thanks to the power of mahjong. A critical and popular favorite in China, SPICY LOVE SOUP is universal in its appeal and fresh in its depiction of everyday living. Yang's new film, SHOWER, screens at the Film Center on July 5.    (97 mins.)

JUNE 23 24 -  FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
AMERICAN GYPSY: A STRANGER IN EVERYBODY'S LAND
US 1999
DIRECTOR: JASMINE DELLAL   America is home to one million Roma (Gypsies) whose rich culture has long been mysterious to outsiders. The target of many forms of discrimination and persecution, Dellal's film traces the history of Roma diaspora, the traditions and lifestyles that have kept them both united and outsiders, and the difficulties they face in preserving an old culture while living in a new one. Shot over five years, Dellal's primary focus is on the charged life of the outspoken Jimmy Marks and his family who live in Spokane, Washington. One of the few Roma willing to publicly talk about the prejudices Gypsies suffer, Marks was the target of an illegal and culturally disrespectful Spokane police crime raid. His high-profile civil rights battle to clear his name brings to the surface the stereotypes, racism and xenophobia that still linger after centuries.
Jasmine Dellal in attendance.  (80 mins.)

JUNE 25 26 - SUN 7 P.M, MON 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
VISITING ARTIST
THE LAST ANGRY MAN:  OREGON'S SENATOR  WAYNE MORSE
US 1999
DIRECTORS: CHRISTOPHER HOUSER, ROBERT MILLIS    Oregon's Senator Wayne Morse remains one of the most controversial politicians in the state's history. In a career that stretched from1944 to 1968—when he was finally defeated by the up-and-coming Bob Packwood— Morse spoke his mind with rare courage, singular charisma and, to some, raw arrogance. A legend to labor unions and a champion of educators, Morse's shining hour was the Vietnam War, when he was the most outspoken, and sometimes only, Senatorial conscience calling for immediate American withdrawl. Featuring a wealth of film clips and interviews with many of the political leaders of the era, from Mark Hatfield, George McGovern and Packwood to Ken Kesey, Houser and Millis's film offers a fascinating overview of his political genius and enigmatic public career. In a time of increasing social activism and growing political cynicism, Morse's legacy of outspoken challenge to the status quo remains all the more relevant.   (56 mins.)
Robert Millis in attendance.
WITH
ROLL ON COLUMBIA: WOODY GUTHRIE & THE BONEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION
US 1999
DIRECTORS: MICHAEL MAJDIC,  DENISE MATTHEWS   In the spring of 1941, on the cusp of the Great Depression, a 28-year old, unemployed Dust Bowl balladeer, Woodrow Wilson Guthrie took a one-month job with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The BPA decided it needed a folksinger to help promote the benefits of building dams on the Columbia to produce cheap electricity for all. Guthrie, with a wife and three children, needed the job and more than delivered, writing 26 songs in 30 days, among them classics like "Roll on Columbia," "Pastures of Plenty" and "Jackhammer Blues." Majdic and Matthews’ captivating piece of regional history documents the most unusual convergence of a left-wing poet and a mammoth Federal Government project, drawing on the reminisences of son Arlo Guthrie, daughter Nora Guthrie, Studs Terkel, Pete Seeger and many others on hand at the time.   (60 mins.)
Michael Majdic in attendance.

JUNE 27 - TUE 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
THE PEBBLE
U.S. 2000
Over the last six months the Film Center has been pleased to partner with the ©reativity on film™ project, a national pilot project of the Los Angeles-based Artists Rights Foundation, a non-profit organization who’s mission is to safeguard the rights of film artists, ensure that the artist’s vision remains intact, and, along with the Film Center, is vitally interested in fostering the creative vision of youth.  Join us tonight for the fruit of the collaboration as we premiere the efforts of the 17 metro area youth participating in the project.  Selected by the Film Center from more than 100 applicants for their arts experience and personal commitment to cinematic excellence, the youth have written, produced and edited this original short narrative film guided by Film Center faculty member Bushra Azzouz and supporting mediamaker-mentors Wayne Woods, Martha Geis, Mark McGee and Johnnie Stallings. A tale of two teenage sisters who must come to terms with the different paths their lives have taken, THE PEBBLE is an affirming slice-of-life meditation on the many challenges which teens face today. Our thanks to the Artist Rights Foundation, Regional Arts & Culture Council’s Neighborhood Arts Program and Portland Public Schools School To Work Program for making this project possible.
FREE ADMISSION

JUNE 30 JULY 1 - FRI 7 & 9 P.M., SAT 7 & 9 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
BETTER LIVING THROUGH CIRCUITRY
US 1999
DIRECTOR: JOHN REISS   A passionate exploration of the exploding culture of electronic dance music, Reiss combines fly-on-the wall verite with interviews in which DJs and musicians talk about their music and demonstrate the dynamic aspects of rave culture from empowerment through technology, to the DIY (do-it-yourself) ethic and the flowering of a new spirituality. Among the many featured are Moby, The Crystal Method, Roni Size and DJ Spooky, Carl Cox and Frankie Bones. "Reiss's hip, hypnotic and at times riveting film demystifies raves and sets the bar for others to explore this culture and music."—URB MAGAZINE.    (86 mins.)

JUNE 29 30 JULY 1
THU 7 P.M., FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 P.M..
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
THE AMERICAN FRIEND
GERMANY 1977
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS   Based on Patricia Highsmith's thriller "Ripley's Game," Bruno Gantz plays Zimmerman, a Hamburg frame shop owner diagnosed with a fatal blood disease. With the promise of medical treatment, he agrees to take part in an assassination plot organized by a French gangster (Gerard Blain) and masterminded by Ripley (Dennis Hopper), a mysterious American. Zimmerman is immersed into a neon-like underworld in Paris, a foreigner in a foreign culture and part of a "mystery" of identity more than crime. Focusing more on character than story, Wenders’ exciting visual style and fascinating take on the homogenization of international culture remains one of the key works of the New German Cinema.  (127 mins.)   Print courtesy of the Goethe Institute.

JULY 5 - WED 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
SILVER SCREEN PREMIERE
SHOWER
CHINA 1999
DIRECTOR: ZHANG YANG   The new film by the director of SPICY LOVE SOUP (see June 23) is a bittersweet human comedy exploring the often difficult loss of tradition in the onrush of cultural change. In modern Beijing, an aging father, Lin, and his retarded youngest son, run a conservative bathhouse serving an aging clientele. Once a thriving community center, it is now a haven for men to drink tea, play chess and gamble on dueling crickets. Into the past comes the future, Lin's thoroughly modern oldest son Daming, who mistakenly thinks his father has died and learns the hard way how progress threatens family and memory. Full of wonderful characters and performances, Zhang again provides a touching, insightful portrait of ordinary life in contemporary China. (92 mins.)
Print courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics.
Admission is limited to Silver Screen Club members and guests.

JULY 6 7 8 9
THU 7 P.M. FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 P.M., sun  7 p.m.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
HUMANITY
FRANCE 1999
DIRECTOR: BRUNO DUMONT   The David Cronenberg-headed jury at the 1999 Cannes Film Festival awarded the prestigious Grand Prize to Dumont's (THE LIFE OF JESUS, PIFF 21) film, the tale of a heinous child-murder in the small, northern French town of Bailleul. Centering on Pharon (Emmanuel Schotte), an oddly naive, or perhaps feeble-minded detective who slowly, and often ineptly, searches for the killer. For those who find the film moving and beautiful, as many have found it unbearable in its realistic depictions of graphic sex and violence. Adding to the film's controversy, Schotte and actress Sevrine Canelle were also awarded the Best Actor and Best Actress prizes at Cannes, heading a cast of mostly non-professionals. A visceral exploration into the nature of personal and universal guilt, Dumont has created a stark portrait of human suffering, compassionate, but challenging in what it demands from the viewer.    (148 mins.)

JULY 7 8 9
FRI 7 & 9 P.M., SAT 7 & 9 P.M., SUN 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
F FOR FAKE
FRANCE 1973
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES   Long unavailable in the US and a key work in understanding the director, Welles last released film before his death has more currency than ever, given its focus on fakery, forgery and frauds—a natural subject for the master of legerdemain. Described as "a vertigo of lies" (James Naremore), F FOR FAKE is equal parts meditation, documentary, magic act and con game. Proceeding from two dictums—Picasso's "Truth is a lie" and Welles’ own "I am a charlatan"—this dizzying examination of hoaxes, big and small, famous and infamous, interweaves several stories: Elmyr de Hory's forgeries of Picasso, Matisse and Modigliani; Clifford Irving's "biography" of Howard Hughes; and Welles’  "War of the Worlds" broadcast. The film itself becomes a kind of fake, bearing the signature of its auteur, but made by many hands. "Don't believe anything" the director intones, "it's all done with mirrors." "A charming, witty meditation...stylish in all its parts."—Vincent Canby, THE NEW YORK TIMES.    (85 mins.) Print courtesy of the British Film Institute.

JULY 13  - THU 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
OPEN SCREENING
Regional film and videomakers are encouraged to bring or send work for open screening. Admission is free and there is no charge to show work. To ensure we can arrange for the equipment you require, please make sure your works arrive at the Film Center office, 1219 SW Park, by July 7. For more information call Sarah Marcus: 276-4259.

JULY 13 15 16
THU 7 P.M., SAT 7P.M., SUN 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
THE SPECIALIST
FRANCE 1999
DIRECTOR: EYAL SIVAN   In 1960, after a decade of searching, the Israeli Secret service captured German SS Lt. Commander Adolf Eichman in Argentina. One year later he went on trial in Jerusalem, seated in a bullet-proof glass box, accused of crimes against humanity. To record the historic trial, the Israelis hired blacklisted documentary filmmaker Leo Hurwitz, (NATIVE LAND, STRANGE VICTORY) who shot more than 350 hours of trial testimony. Out of this material, Sivan has constructed (now on 35mm) a chilling portrait of the career of a man who, "just following orders" as head of the department charged with "Jewish Affairs and Evacuations," arranged transit to the Nazi death camps. Relying on music and editing to shape the material, Sivan lets the testimony tell the story of, in the memorable words of philosopher Hannah Arendt, "the banality of evil."   (128 mins.)

JULY 14  - FRI 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
SILVER SCREEN CLUB PREMIERE
SAVING GRACE
US 2000
DIRECTOR: NIGEL COLE   "Since the advent of FOUR WEDDINGS AND A FUNERAL, the big-hearted British ensemble film has found delighted American audiences. In this newest installment, recently widowed Grace (Brenda Blethyn) has been left a lovely manor house on the Cornish coast. Unfortunately, she has also been bequeathed a 300,000-pound debt. Desperate times call for desperate measures, and Grace turns to her now unemployed caretaker Matthew (Craig Ferguson), who suggests she use her gardening skill to make some real money. And so the two remodel her orchid hothouse into a marijuana plantation, Hilarious moments ensue as she tries on the role of Notting Hill pusher. The charming finale soundly revokes the adage of crime not paying."—Andrea Alsberg, Sundance Film Festival.    (93 mins.)
Print courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics.
Admission limited to Silver Screen Club members and their guests.

JULY 14 15  - FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
CLOSE-UP
IRAN 1990
DIRECTOR: ABBAS KIAROSTAMI   "Werner Herzog calls this 'the greatest documentary on filmmaking I have ever seen.' Much stranger than fiction, CLOSE-UP recounts the bizarre case of Hossein Sabzian, a frustrated film buff who pretended to be well-known Iranian director Mohsen Makhmalbaf (THE PEDDLER, GABBEH, A MOMENT OF INNOCENCE). Under the guise of preparing a new project, the imposter wormed his way into the home and hearts of the well-to-do, but naive, Ahankhans family. His ruse, however, was soon discovered by a magazine reporter. Kiarostami (THE TASTE OF CHERRY, THROUGH THE OLIVE TREES, AND LIFE GOES ON) read a newspaper article about the incident, obtained permission to film Sabzian's trial, and afterwards persuaded all involved (except the journalist) to recreate the events. Poignant, compelling and frequently humorous, CLOSE-UP works on many levels. It documents the vulnerable nature of the human ego, highlighting every person's need for recognition and self-esteem. Its mix of cinema verite and reenactment underscores the subjective nature of 'filmed truth.' Ironically, it also fulfills the dreams of both Sabzian and the family he duped, allowing them to be in the movies at last." —Alissa Simon  (100 mins.)
WITH
CLOSE-UP LONG SHOT
IRAN 1996
DIRECTORS: MAHMOUD CHOKROLLAHI, MOSLEM MANSOURI   CLOSE UP LONG SHOT is a close-up of the "real" Hossein in Kiarostami's CLOSE UP. Here, he is still an incurable movie fan and remains convinced that screen reality is true reality, that his deception was "sincere," how it won him short-lived fame, a great deal of trouble and much sympathy.   (44 mins.)

JULY 21 22  - FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
JUAN, I FORGOT, I DON'T REMEMBER
MEXICO 1998
DIRECTOR: JUAN CARLOS RULFO   An exploration of age and memory through the engaging stories of a group of elderly people from the southern Mexico state of Jalisco,  Rulfo's soulful film focuses on the late (1918-1986) Juan Rulfo (the filmmaker's father) a renowned writer and poet. Although everyone interviewed remembers Juan Rulfo's name, they cannot remember much about his life or who he really was. Instead, as they struggle with their memories, they reveal a great deal about themselves in intimate detail, painting a vivid montage of the lives they lived. Rulfo's humorous, captivating "docu-fiction" is a charming portrait of an era characterized by dignified ruggedness and hardship. "It contains the kind of visual poetry and allegorical composition that leaves a lasting impression."—Ramiro Puerta, Toronto Film Festival. (75 mins.)

JULY 21 22 - FRI 7 & 9 P.M., SAT 7 & 9 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
DIVINE TRASH
US 1998
DIRECTOR: STEVE YEAGER   Winner of the Filmmaker's Trophy at the Sundance Film Festival, DIVINE TRASH is an in-depth look at the early career of filmmaker John Waters from the macabre childhood puppet shows in his native Baltimore to the successful release of his cult classic PINK FLAMINGOS (1972). Featuring interviews with the 25-year-old Waters, never-before-seen footage shot during production and interviews with many of the film's now-deceased cast members—including Glen Milstead (aka Divine, Water's "Elizabeth Taylor"), Yeager reveals the drive, ambition and wild creativity of one of film's most unique voices. "It would be a great film to show at my funeral." —John Waters.  (97 mins.)
Presented in conjunction with the Portland Art Museum's exhibition "Let's Entertain" featuring artists whose work engages our cultural fixation on entertainment, shock, spectacle and commerce.

JULY 27 - THU 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
VISITING ARTIST
AN EVENING WITH CHEL WHITE: NAKED CINEMA
Portland filmmaker Chel White's work, (DIRT; COTTONMOUTH, TEXAS; PHOTOCOPY CHA CHA CHA)  whether animated or live action, is marked by experimentation, playfulness and supreme craftsmanship. Tonight he premieres his latest film, SOULMATES, a complex study of alienated and sexual obsession told from the perspective of a 55-year-old woman. Like his earlier, award-winning DIRT, the film is based on a short story by National Public Radio personality Joe Frank. The cast includes Portland actors Vanna O'Brien, Randy Russell, Gina Velour and Teresa Duke. Complimenting his new film, White has selected a provocative mix of new personal, animated and experimental films that have caught his eye, including new works by  Jay Rosenblatt, Leighton Pierce, Shanti Thakur, Lorelei Pepi and Jeff Walker.  (90 mins.)

JULY 28 29 30
FRI 7 & 9 P.M. SAT 7 & 9 P.M., SUN 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
LIFE IS TO WHISTLE
CUBA 1999
DIRECTOR: FERNANDO PEREZ   Winner of the Best Film, Best Director and Best Cinematography prizes at the Havana Film Festival, and an audience favorite at the 23rd PIFF, Perez's lush, visually vibrant look at millennial Havana is at once hilarious, surreal and subtly critical. On the day of Santa Barbara, "Chango," the African Saint of Destinies, causes the lives of three very different people to intersect. Mariana, a ballerina, ponders breaking chastity vows she made to land the coveted role of Giselle; Julia, a middle-aged woman, faints whenever she hears the word "sex" and Elpido, a musician, seduces a gringa marine biologist but thinks constantly of mom. Our narrator, Bebe, speaking somewhere from the next century, takes us on a taxi ride through Havana and comments with bemusement on the jaded lives of our characters. Set to the music of Bola de Nieve and Benny More and inspired by the painter Rene Magritte, this joyous film dazzles with its uniquely Cuban blend of absurdist humor and mystical realism.    (106 mins.)

AUGUST 2 -  WED 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
SILVER SCREEN PREMIERE
GIRL ON THE BRIDGE
FRANCE 1999
DIRECTOR: PATRICE LECONTE   Leconte’s (THE HAIRDRESSER'S HUSBAND, RIDICULE, MONSIEUR HIRE) clever comedy-fairy tale begins one night on a Paris bridge. Adele (Vanessa Paradise) leans out over the Seine with tears in her eyes. Out of the darkness emerges a stranger who will change her life. Gabor (Daniel Auteuil) is a knife thrower who needs a human target for his show and the luckless Adele has nowhere else to go. Together, they throw knives in the dark, spin roulette wheels, and walk tightropes; destiny binds them. Yet fate is whimsical and luck can vanish as quickly as it comes. Auteuil won this year's Cesar for Best Actor. (92 mins.) Print courtesy of Paramount Classics.
Admission limited to Silver Screen members and their guests.

AUGUST 4  5  - FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 & 9P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
TRASH
US 1970
DIRECTOR: PAUL MORRISEY   Produced by Andy Warhol, Morrisey's cult extravaganza stars Joe Dallesandro as Joe, an impotent junkie who lives with Holly (Holly Woodlawn), in a filthy apartment on New York City's Lower East Side. Holly, the inspiration for Lou Reed's classic song "Take A Walk On the Wild Side," is a transvestite who spends time collecting trash, going to the Fillmore East, and cruising for sex. Jane (Jane Forth) is the acid casulaty housewife who listens to Pink Floyd and not much else. The trio form an alternately funny and grim portrait of late-sixties underground life as only Warhol could appreciate it.   (97 mins.)
Presented in conjunction with the Portland Art Museum's exhibition "Let's Entertain" featuring artists whose work engages our cultural fixation on entertainment, shock, spectacle and commerce.

AUGUST 4  - SAT 9:15 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
PERIPHERAL PRODUCE
EXPERIMENTAL SHORTS
Guest curator Matt McCormick presents a collection of new experimental and underground work selected from this year's New York Underground, Taos and South x Southwest Film Festivals, along with a sampling of local work and avant garde classics. As always,McCormick promises an eclectic, animated evening of cinematic discovery.   (2 hrs.)
Special Admission: $5

AUGUST 10 11 12
THU 7 P.M., FRI 7 P.M., SAT 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
L'ATALANTE
FRANCE 1934
DIRECTOR: JEAN VIGO   One of the most talented, romantic and tragic figures in French cinema, Jean Vigo died (at age 29) just weeks before the release of his only full-length feature film. Consistently voted among of the top ten films in the history of cinema in all variety of critics' polls, the story is a simple erotic romance set on a slow Seine river barge trip to Paris. Two newly weds, accompanied by the eccentric raconteur Pere Jules, fight, separate and and reconcile. Vigo tells the story in his own delightful realist style, making use of the evocative found locations, but at the same time revealing the inner-spirit of his chararcters with an almost surreal poeticism. The British critic Philip Fench summed it up: "L'ATALANTE is one of the most beautiful and haunting movies ever made... sad, funny, humane—it defines what is meant by the poetry of the cinema."    (82 mins.)

AUGUST 21 - MON 7 PM
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
ANIMATED WORLDS
DIRECTORS: VARIOUS   Back by popular demand, this collection features world class animation by a host of artists who all happen to live in Portland. Having won every conceivable award among them, including a couple of Oscars, these filmmakers have created animation that will amuse and inspire. Included are vintage works by Jim Blashfield, Joan Gratz, Chel White, Will Vinton, and Joanna Priestley, who has just recently been honored with a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The perfect way to spend an animated summer evening.  (107 mins.)


OUT OF AFRICA
In the 1950s and 60s African filmmakers began to emerge, telling the story of African culture, identity and history by those who lived it rather than by those who witnessed it. In the decades since, a rich body of work has resulted, as diverse as the continent itself, reflecting on everything from pre and post colonial history, to "tribal" folklore and politics to stories reflecting the rapid transition from traditional to modern society. This year we are once again pleased to host The African Traveling Film Festival, an annual showcase of recent films offering diverse perspectives on African culture and broader appreciation of the rich traditions offered to the the rest of the world. The Festival has been organized by African Film Festival, Inc., in association with the Film Society of Lincoln Center and the support of the National Endowment for the Arts, Rockefeller Foundation and Ford Foundation.

JUNE 15 - THU 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
MORTU NEGA
GUINEA-BISSAU 1988
DIRECTOR: FLORA GOMES   Literally meaning "the one death did not want," mortu nega is a term that originally refers to a child who survives his stillborn siblings but comes to symbolize the survivors of the fight for Guinea-Bissau's independence. The story, set in 1973, follows Dominga as she journeys to join her husband, Sako, a liberation fighter. While her path to the front reveals the ravages of five centuries of colonialism, her return home will be amidst the joy of hard-won freedom.   (85 mins.)
WITH
O CLANDESTINO
REPUBLIC OF CONGO/ANGOLA 1997
When an Angolan stowaway lands in Lisbon, he learns that the Europe of his dreams may not be the paradise he had imagined. Constantly evading a persistent police officer, he begins to long for his homeland, realizing that for an African, Europe is not refuge from hardship.   (15 mins.)

JUNE 22 -  THU 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
TGV
SENEGAL 1997
DIRECTOR: MOUSSA TOURE   TGV is an express bus service, driven by Rambo, between Dakar (Senegal) and Conakry (Guinea). Before setting off one day, Rambo and his passengers are warned of the danger: the Bassari are carrying on a revolt along the border...On hearing the news, only a dozen or so hapless passengers decide to make the apparently risky trip. A comic road movie into the heart of Senegalese society, Toure touches upon democracy, corruption, women's rights, militarist groups and the power of the media and technology, all without forgetting to nail a couple of French ethnologists on the way.   (90 mins.)
WITH
L'ETRANGER VENU D'AFRIQUE
REPUBLIC OF CONGO 1998
DIRECTOR: JOSEPH KUMBELA   Sun, a young Chinese woman, returns home to find her boyfriend Lulu, an African student, waiting for her. Against the background of Bejiing, the cultural differences that arise provoke conflict, as well as the voyeuristic interest of others.   (13 mins.)

JUNE 29 -  THU 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
COMEDIA INFANTIL
MOZAMBIQUE/SWEDEN  1997
DIRECTOR: SOLVEIG NORDLUND   Adapted from a Swedish novel that uses poetic drama to illuminate and humanize difficult social issues, Nordlund's film is a touching account of the hardships faced by a young boy, Nelio, during Mozambique's civil war. After losing his family during a raid on his village, Nelio manages to escape from a camp for young soldiers. Upon reaching the capital, he becomes the leader of a group of street children who believe he has the power to cure diseases. His burgeoning reputation as a healer, however, cannot shield him from the brutality of war.    (100 mins.)
WITH
THE FOREIGNER
SOUTH AFRICA 1997
DIRECTOR: ZOLA MASEKO   Koffi has arrived in town. Turned away by the neighborhood residents, he becomes friends with a homless child, Vusi. Their friendship grows despite the hostility and aggression directed toward "the foreigner" amidst the bustle of life in the streets. (10 mins.)

JULY 6 - THU 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE
THE BATTLE OF THE SACRED TREE
KENYA 1995
DIRECTOR: WANJIRU KINYANJUI   Traditional African beliefs come into conflict with missionary zeal in a Kikuyu village. There, life revolves around a sacred tree that exudes a strange power over everyone around it. Needless to say, Christian ladies see the tree as an offensive reminder of a pagan past. Standing against their plan to cut the tree down is Mumbi, daughter of an old-fashioned medicine man, who has returned from the city after leaving her abusive husband. Her Polaroid snapshots of "the most dramatic occasion of the Felling of the Sacred Tree" reunites the community in healing laughter.    (80 mins.)
WITH
COLIS POSTAL
REPUBLIC OF CONGO 1996
DIRECTOR: JOSEPH KUMBELA   Isidore, an African living in Paris, awaits the arrival of his fiancee from Abidjan. He has a terrible secret and doesn't begin to know how to tell her.  (10 mins.)


ALAIN RESNAIS: MEMORY AND MODERNISM

Alain Resnais, having made short films and documentaries since the 1930s, burst upon the international film scene with his haunting holocaust meditation NIGHT AND FOG (1956). With his subsequent two feature films, HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR (1959) and LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD (1961), he confirmed his place in the history of cinema, creating a whole new approach to cinematic storytelling. Shifting time, memory, past and present, Resnais fractured the conventions of narrative, linear storytelling. As Francois Truffaut observed "Once you've seen HIROSHIMA it is impossible to make movies the way you used to." So too to see them. The fresh vision and playful, adventurous experimentation has continued over the subsequent decades—with a cadre of distinguished artistic collaborators—  yielding an extraordinary body of distinctive, intellectually challenging and often witty mediations on the nature of the mind, love and the possibilities of cinema.

This tribute to Alain Resnais has been organized by Gwen Deglise of the American Cinematheque in Los Angeles, with the generous cooperation of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Paris (MAE), and the assistance of the French Film Office, NY, Harvard Film Archive and Pacific Film Archive.

AUGUST 3  -  THU 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
HIROSHIMA, MON AMOUR
FRANCE 1959
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   Resnais' first feature film, based on a script by Marguerite Duras, was originally to be a short documentary about Hiroshima twelve years after the bomb. The poetic fictional story focuses on the aftermath of a brief affair between a Japanese architect and Elle, a French actress making her own antiwar documentary in Japan. The tryst only revives Elle's memories of her past love with a German man during wartime France and the punishment she suffered for her perceived treason. Told with great poignancy, HIROSHIMA remains one of the most devastating love stories ever put on film and, in its seamless shifting between past and present, fusion of sound, image and text, is one of the classics of French cinema. A landmark of modernist film narrative, "HIROSHIMA has been as important to the development of film art as CITIZEN CANE."— James Monaco.   (90 mins.)
WITH
NIGHT AND FOG
FRANCE 1956
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   How we remember and what we forget, indelibly explored in a classic meditation on the horror of Auschwitz.   (30 mins.)

AUGUST 4  -  FRI 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD
FRANCE 1961
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   At a spa in a baroque castle, little distinction rests between reality and fantasy as a man (Giorgio Albertazzi) attempts to convince a woman (Delphine Seyrig) that a year earlier they met and fell in love —perhaps at the very place they are now. As the pair timelessly glide through a surreal dreamscape haunted by silhouettes and shadows, LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD "may grip you with a strange enchantment, it may twist your wits into a snarl, it may leave your mind and senses toddling vaguely in the regions in between. But this we can reasonably promise: when you stagger away from it, you will feel you have delighted in (or suffered) a unique and intense experience."—THE NEW YORK TIMES.   (94 mins.)

AUGUST 5 -   SAT 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
MURIEL
FRANCE 1963
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   "Resnais takes a very ordinary incident— the reunion of a provincial woman and her former lover— and out of the trivia of everyday anxieties creates a mosaic of memory and conscience, or what Susan Sontag called ‘an examination of the form of emotion.’ Helene (Delphine Seyrig), an antique dealer in Boulogne, lives in the hermetic life of her memories and those of her stepson Bernard, who spends his days sorting evidence of French atrocities in Algeria collected on his tour of duty. The memory of Muriel, a young girl tortured by his fellow soldiers, is more real to him than day-to-day life. When Helene's old lover shows up unexpectedly, the past comes full circle, only to prove finally the impossibility of remembering, and of forgetting. Resnais presents the drama in a chain of intercut scenes—which is to say, horizontally connected, and always in the present."—Pacific Film Archive. Winner of the International Critic's Prize at the Venice Film Festival.   (116 mins.)

AUGUST 6  -  SUN 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
SHORT SKETCHES
FRANCE 1947
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   At age 25 Resnais began making short documentaries. Among his interests were contemporary abstract and surrealist painters—"I thought why don't I talk painting with painters? I would learn things about painting, at least it would be a nice conversation...!" The result was this collection of early "sketches," not fully completed films in his opinion, some silent, some with music, all full of curiosity. VISITE A LUCIEN COUTARD (10 mins.), VISITE A FELIX LABISSE (15 mins.), VISITE A HANS HARTUNG (15 mins.), VISITE A CESAR DOMELA (15 mins.), PORTRAIT D'HENRI GOETZ (24 mins.), and VISITE A CHRISTINE BOUMEESTER (10 mins.).

AUGUST 10  -  THU 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
JE T'AIME, JE T'AIME
FRANCE 1968
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   Claude Ridder (Claude Rich) has just recovered from a suicide attempt when he is chosen to participate in a time-travel experiment. Nestled into a brain-like sphere, Ridder is joined by a laboratory mouse and sent back to relive a moment of his past life with his love, Catrine (Olga Georges-Picot). On his journey Ridder is catapulted through numerous fragmentary episodes of his past, confusing his sense of his own, true experience. Memories collide with fallacies; the death of his lover may or may not have been his direct doing. Finally, perhaps by chance, perhaps through his own volition, Ridder finds himself returned to the moment where his journey began. "...With Chris Marker's LA JETÉE and Andrei Tarkovsky's SOLARIS it constitutes the holy trinity of meditations on the horrors of eternal life."—Raymond Durgnat.   (91 mins.)

AUGUST 11  -  FRI 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
STAVISKY
FRANCE 1974
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   "STAVISKY is an exquisite recounting of the climactic days in 1933 in the career of the con man turned international financier whose ruin resulted in political scandal and his own mysterious death. With a screenplay written by George Semprum of Z, Resnais has made a remarkably elegant film flowing into past and future to underscore the present, analyzing not only the megalomania of his central figure, but also the society and time that allowed him to flourish."—John Simon, NEW YORK MAGAZINE. Music by Stephen Sondheim. With Jean-Paul Belmondo, Charles Boyer, Anne Duperey and Gerard Depardieu.   (117 mins.)

AUGUST 12   - SAT 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
MON ONCLE D'AMERIQUE
FRANCE 1980
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   Three lives, three ambitions. Jean (Gerard Depardieu) a textile factory manager, Rene (Roger-Pierre) an intellectual, would-be politician, and Janine (Nicole Garcia) an aspiring actress, belong to three different generations and backgrounds as far removed from each other culturally as they are geographically. Most likely their lives would never intersect, but one day they find themselves in a common struggle to grasp love, success, happiness and survival—both real and imagined. Resnais observes their behaviors in the context of the psycho-biological (and rat-tested) theories of psychologist Henri Laborit, while comically interweaving guest appearances by three of French cinema's greatest stars—Jean Gabin, Jean Marias and Danielle Darrieux, alter-egos whose on-screen lives mirror those of the subjects under study. Each responds to life's pressures through flight, struggle or inhibition and each hold out hope that their "uncle" in America will come to their rescue.  "The funniest movie about working since Chaplin’s MODERN TIMES."—Andrew Sarris  (125 mins)

AUGUST 13  -  SUN 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
LIFE IS A BED OF ROSES
FRANCE 1983
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   Part two of the trilogy begun by MON ONCLE D'AMERIQUE, LIFE IS A BED OF ROSES is told in three stories (or, in Resnais’ view, one story with three themes), set in the utopian castle of Count Michel Forbek (opera singer Ruggero Raimondi). Once the Count's personal "Temple of Happiness," the castle has become a progressive school for teachers and, for their students, a child's fantasy world. "Happiness. Love. The Perfectibility of Man. Grand Abstractions and Grand Illusions. Education and Imagination. Pedagogical pontifications. They are all targets for an unsettling but comic compote...for those who enjoy a little ambiguity and mystery in their fantasies, it's great fun." —Judy Stone, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.   (113 mins.)

AUGUST 18  -  FRI 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE - NOTE THEATER CHANGE!
PROVIDENCE
FRANCE 1977
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   Full of black humor and graceful wit, Resnais’ first English language film, written by absurdist British playwright David Mercer, investigates the process of artistic creation, the uncertainties of existence and the strange inner workings of the mind. Clive Langham (John Gielgud) is an ill, 78-year-old writer working on his last novel, the characters of which are based on the members of his own family who collectively invade his peace. On a drunken night full of hallucinated dreams and memories, he reinvents them all, in the process coming to terms with his own guilt, the ironies of life and the anxieties of impending death. One of Resnais’ most intriguing and audaciously structured films, the cast includes Dirk Bogart, Ellen Burstyn and David Warner.    (110 mins.)

AUGUST 19  - SAT 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE - NOTE THEATER CHANGE!
AUGUST 22 - TUE 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
MELO
FRANCE 1986
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   MELO (as in melodrama) is adapted from a classic, but hopelessly dated 1929 play by Henry Bernstein. Two musicians have been friends since their days at the conservatory. One (Andre Dussollier) has gone on to a successful career as a violinist, while the other (Pierre Ardite), a pianist, has settled down to a seemingly cheery, but ultimately strained, marriage. A torrid affair between Dussollier and Ardite's wife (Sabine Azema) sets the stage for mutual tragedy. Resnais, rather than "opening it up" in traditional cinematic fashion, masterfully emphasizes the theatrical, in the process creating an extraordinarily beautiful and uniquely stylized work. The marvelous Art Deco sets, as artificial as the impassioned story, provide delightful backdrop for stellar performances and a riveting reality fashioned from the delights of stage and screen.
(112 mins.)

AUGUST 20  -  SUN 7 P.M.
GUILD THEATRE - NOTE THEATER CHANGE!
LOVE UNTO DEATH
FRANCE 1984
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   In the final piece of the trilogy that includes MON ONCLE D'AMERIQUE and LIFE IS A BED OF ROSES, Resnais and screenwriter Jean Gruault offer a dazzling meditation on love's power to resurrect that which has been lost. Returning to life from a mysterious fatal collapse, Simon (Pierre Arditi) re-experiences his life and love for Elisabeth (Sabine Azema). Their love is intensified, but confounded by his medical and spiritual status. Was he dreaming? Was he really dead? Friends enlisted to lend perspective on their dilemma only add to the confusion. A reflection on love, life and theology, Resnais mixes rigorous intellect, dry wit and, as always, provocative cinematic structure to tell his story.
(93 mins.)

AUGUST 23  -  WED 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
I WANT TO GO HOME
FRANCE 1989
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   I WANT TO GO HOME serves as Resnais’ homage to a life-long love for the comic strip and pulp fiction. Visiting Paris for an exhibition of his art, American cartoonist Joey Wellman (played by legendary SINGING IN THE RAIN composer Adolph Green) also makes it the opportunity to arrange a reunion with his estranged daughter (Linda Laving), a Sorbonne student who lives and breathes French literature. In an irony characteristic of Resnais’ style, the brilliant scholar his daughter has been desperately trying to get to read her thesis (Gerald) happens to be a great fan of her father's work. Dad, of course, has nothing but contempt for slumming, suck-up intellectuals, especially French ones. Written by cartoonist Jules Feiffer, this satire on the triumph of pop culture won the Best Screenplay award at the Venice Film Festival.    (110 mins.)

AUGUST 24  -  THU 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
SMOKING
FRANCE 1993
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   "The seemingly irrelevant question that serves as the starting point for this highly unusual filmic experiment is whether or not a woman will light up a cigarette. The fate of nine characters (all played by Sabine Azema and Pierre Arditi) depends on whether Celia Teasdale does or does not yield to temptation. Set in the English provincial backwater of Hutton Buscel, the film's main characters are the headmaster of the local school, his wife, her daily help, a couple whose marriage is on the rocks, a gardener, a poet, a mother-in-law and another headmistress. SMOKING AND NO SMOKING are based on six linked theatrical pieces written by Alan Ayckbourn in 1982. Altogether the two films have twelve different endings."— Berlin Film Festival. "SMOKING/NO SMOKING begins with the choice of alternative actions, then forks into a series of possibilities...it’s like an illustration of chaos theory enacted with the flip of a coin."—Jonathan Romney, SIGHT AND SOUND. "I wanted people to get lost in a sort of labyrinth, and enjoy it."— Alain Resnais.   (135 mins)

AUGUST 25  - FRI 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
NO SMOKING
FRANCE 1993
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   Please see SMOKING, August 24

AUGUST 26  -  SAT 7 P.M.
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
SAME OLD SONG
FRANCE 1997
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS   "I've often noticed that popular songs accompany the acts of our everyday lives. If we behaved at all naturally, we'd use song lyrics in conversation." Resnais’ newest film is an unexpected, airy homage to Dennis Potter (THE SINGING DETECTIVE, PENNIES FROM HEAVEN) inventor of a post-modern musical style in which the characters, faced with a difficult decision or repressed inner emotions, break into snatches of popular songs, lip syncing to original recordings. In Resnais’ delightfully intelligent film, a contemporary comedy of manners about love, adultery and Parisian real estate speculation, the effect is often hilarious as bits of Johnny Halliday, Maurice Chevalier, Josephine Baker, Edith Piaf and contemporary pop interrupt earnest conversations, but always as asides unbeknownst to those with whom they share the screen.    (120 mins.)


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